Multiple Choice Articulation Application Review and Giveaway

Would you rather win an application or not win an application? Would you like that application with hot chocolate or no hot chocolate? I think I know your answer... I am pleased to announce that you can enter to win not just the Multiple Choice Articulation application but also a $10 Starbucks gift card at the end of this post! However, this blog entry is not all about the giveaway, it's about what you can do with the Multiple Choice Articulation application! Encourage carryover of speech and language skills while having fun and giggling away! To learn more about the application and enter the giveaway, continue reading.


Multiple Choice Articulation Main Page

Main Page

The Main Page showcases five later developing speech sounds - s, z, r, l, sh, ch, and th - each with their own blue circle button. The background color is aesthetically pleasing as well. There is also an "i" button which brings you to the Information Page.

Information Page

This page, in which you can swipe to scroll up and down, discusses information about the developer, how to use the application, its intended use and population, examples of application use, as well as the developer's website and contact information. In addition, due to the hilarity of some of the questions/recorded answers, it is stated multiple times that the questions/answers should not be acted upon as they can be quite dangerous and/or disgusting.

Application Play

Multiple Choice Articulation R

Press on one of the sound circles for the phoneme which you wish to have the user practice. Consonants can be practiced in the initial, medial, or final positions of words within sentences. In addition, s-blends, r-blends, and l-blends can be practiced. You may only choose one sound and position within the word. Once the sound and its position have been chosen, application play will begin.

Multiple Choice Articulation Medial L

A "would you rather"-type question will appear on a card. There will be multiple words with the user's speech sound to be practiced in bold and the sound in particular underlined as well within each question. You can read the card to your student, have it read by the developer by pressing the "Hear the Question" button, or have the student state the question aloud. The student must then respond to the question which would elicit the particular sound due to the multiple choice nature of the question. In addition, each question asks "Why" at the end to encourage more spontaneous speech and carryover skills. If the student needs an example of an answer, he or she may ask a peer or the speech-language pathologist, or press the "Hear an Answer" button to listen to the developer's opinion full of the students' speech sound. Once a question has been answered, press the "Back" or "Next" buttons to navigate to a new question card. Press the "Home" button to return to the Main Menu following application play.

What I Like About This Application:

  • There are not many applications on the market that practice articulation in elicited speech and carryover skills.
  • I like that the sounds available on the application are the ones that I have the most clients practicing.
  • The questions are fun which makes the application motivating in the fact that you look forward to seeing what kinds of crazy questions are coming up.
  • The fact that there is audio of the developer answering silly questions not only using the child's speech sounds but being enthusiastic and silly himself helps elicit students' speech.

What I Would Like to See in Future Updates:

  • I am a big fan of user profiles and data tracking for students. Even a plus or minus button would be great to monitor a child's speech without having to write on a separate piece of paper.
  • I would like to see the ability for a user to play multiple sounds at a time. I have students who are in the carryover phase of more than one sound, so this would allow me to focus on more than one sound without having to switch between the two.
  • It would be great to be able to record student response audio so that you can evaluate student progress in elicited speech and the student can self-assess his or her own speech.
  • Of course, I would love to see more sounds on this application such as /k/, /g/, /f/, /v/, and /dg/!
  • It might be nice to have silly visuals along with the questions for those who have difficulty visualizing different concepts within questions. That and it would definitely be more motivating and fun!

Therapy Use:

  • Articulation - The main focus of this application is articulation. Have students ask the questions to each other, get in conversation with each other about different topics, debate between different answers, and elicit specific sounds to have them practice later developing speech sounds.
  • Voice/Fluency - Have students read the questions on the application and answer them using vocal/fluency strategies.
  • WH Questions - Students can practice asking and answering WH questions by using this application.
  • Expressive Language - Students can practice answering questions and giving explanations for their answers on this application. In addition, students can create their own silly sentences. Finally, they can create their own stories related to the questions.
  • Receptive Language - Have students give definitions of the words in bold. They can also describe what the different words would look like, feel like, etc.
  • Pragmatic Language - Talk about opinions and how different people have different opinions. Have students ask each other questions.

Price:

Multiple Choice Articulation is available for the iPad for $9.99.

Disclaimer:

Consonantly Speaking was given a copy of the application to review and two to give away. No other form of compensation was received.

Yapp Guru:

Don't forget to vote for this application on Yapp Guru!

Giveaway:

Enter the Rafflecopter below for your chance to warm up your holidays with this new app AND a $10 Starbucks gift card! Two people have a chance to win this duo!

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